The National AIDS Fund, with support from the Social Innovation Fund, has announced the opportunity for grant support through its Access to Care (A2C) initiative.

The goal of A2C is to increase the access and consistent utilization of effective HIV healthcare by People Living With HIV/AIDS, particularly those living in poverty, who know their HIV status but are not receiving HIV-specific care or support. Over the next three to five years, NAF will support approximately eight to twelve states, regions, and communities with high rates of infection to facilitate access to healthcare by strengthening support and service systems and addressing barriers that affect people’s readiness or ability to participate in HIV healthcare.

Grantseekers are encouraged to focus their applications on marginalized populations that traditionally have less access to, and retention within, medical care. Additionally, NAF seeks to spur innovative solutions to problems that have existed for PLWHA since the beginning of the epidemic — intersecting structural barriers to HIV care that include systems of care that do not address health needs with cultural competency, a lack of quality HIV care in rural or impoverished areas, lack of treatment self-efficacy among PLWHA, stigma and its impact on prevention, care and treatment deficiencies, and the individual-level dynamic that is the result of HIV infection being only one of many competing health and well-being challenges.

Applications should be coordinated by a lead entity for each project; priority will be given to efforts that share resources and involve multiple community partners that together have the trust of populations that experience the greatest challenges accessing healthcare.

Grantees must provide a local 1:1 dollar match toward their awards. NAF recognizes that communities will require assistance in identifying and accessing additional resources and will work with grantee communities in an effort to facilitate the process. Grant amounts are expected to fall into a range of $200,000 to $800,000 each annually, depending on the scope, scale, and numbers of individuals being reached in the proposed project. This range includes the local match amounts that grantees will be responsible for raising with NAF’s assistance.

Visit the National AIDS Fund Web site for complete grant guidelines and application materials: http://www.aidsfund.org/2010/09/20/national-aids-fund-with-support-from-the-social-innovation-fund-announces-availability-of-grant-resources-for-access-to-care-a2c-initiative/

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced the opening of round six of its Grand Challenges Explorations, a $100 million grant initiative to encourage bold and unconventional global health solutions.

Grand Challenges Explorations offers researchers the chance to win grants of $100,000 to foster innovative projects with the potential to transform health in developing countries. The initiative focuses on areas where creative, unorthodox thinking is most urgently needed.

For this round, applicants are asked to focus their proposals on one of five topic areas: new approaches to cure HIV infection; next-generation sanitation technologies; low-cost cell phone-based applications for priority global health conditions; new technologies to support maternal and newborn health; and the poliovirus endgame: ways to accelerate, sustain, and monitor eradication.

The topic focusing on sanitation technologies highlights the integrated approach the foundation is taking toward health in developing countries. Improved sanitation is essential to reducing waterborne illnesses and has profound economic, educational, and social benefits.

The initiative uses a streamlined grantmaking process. Applications are two pages, and preliminary data about the proposed research is not required. All are encouraged to apply.

The foundation and an independent group of reviewers will select the most innovative proposals, and grants will be awarded within approximately four months from the proposal submission deadline.

Initial grants will be $100,000. Projects showing success will have the opportunity to receive additional funding of up to $1 million.
Grand Challenges Web site

From World YWCA

Short Film Commission Where is the Money for Women’s Rights and HIV? – We Are Watching

We are writing to you to let you know about a new resource that the World AIDS Campaign, the World YWCA and Women Wont Wait are developing.

“Where is the Money for HIV?” is a joint campaign building on ARASA’s work, which is planned to be undertaken in partnership by ARASA, APCASO, Art Global Health Center at UCLA, LACCASO, Mosaic (South Africa), World AIDS Campaign (WAC), World YWCA and Caribbean Broadcast Media Partnership on HIV.

As part of this campaign, WAC, the World YWCA and Women Wont Wait are sending out a Call for anyone interested who has the necessary experience to produce a 2 – 3 minute video campaign focusing on “Where is the Money for Women’s Rights and HIV?”.

The video will seek to highlight three main issues:

1. The realities of women and girls around the globe, particularly in regards to HIV related human rights violations
2. The money that is needed to work towards overcoming these violations
3. How money is misspent by governments instead of investing in women’s rights, going for example towards military expenditure instead of financing for women.

Interested persons should send a brief treatment and shot list/paper edit to womenshivfilm@gmail.com no later than September 1st 2010.
Late submissions will not be accepted. For more info: http://www.worldywca.org/YWCA-News/World-YWCA-and-Member-Associations-News/Short-Film-Commission-Where-is-the-Money-for-Women-s-Rights-and-HIV-We-Are-Watching

2010 Out of the Box Prize

August 10, 2010

2010 Out of the Box Prize

* social justice
* competition
* community development
* health
* rural development
* innovation
* awards
* education

Application Deadline: October 31, 2010.

The Community Tool Box will honor innovative approaches to promoting community health and development worldwide with the 2010 Out of the Box Prize. We invite you to enter and encourage you to share contest information with others doing innovative work to improve life in their communities anywhere in the world. (Click here to download a flyer that can be shared with others.)

Your group’s work may involve efforts to improve community health, education, urban or rural development, poverty, the environment, social justice, or other related issues of importance to communities. Applicants must be willing to share the group’s innovative and promising approach with others.

Grand Prize:
$5,000 cash award (USD) + free customized WorkStation for your group (value $2,100)

Second Prize:
$2,000 cash award (USD) + free customized WorkStation for your group

Award Finalists: All Award Finalists stories will be featured on the Community Tool Box as an outstanding example of “Taking Action in Your Community.”

Finalists will be selected by an international panel of judges. Site visitors will vote on their favorite “Out of the Box” project to be awarded the top two prizes.

Important Contest Dates:

8/1/2010: Opening date for applications

10/31/2010: Deadline for submission of applications

11/1 – 11/21/2010: International panel reviews the applications to select Finalists

12/1/2010: Award Finalists posted on the homepage of the Community Tool Box; public voting begins

1/31/2011: Public voting on Award Finalists closes

2/15/2011: Grand Prize and Second Prize announced

We invite you to submit an application. Click here to download application.

Eligibility and Selection Criteria

Any group that has engaged in any aspect of community health and development effort – from planning to sustainability- for the period of 2008 to 2010 can apply. Your group’s work may involve efforts to improve community health, education, urban or rural development, poverty, the environment, social justice, or other related issues of importance to communities. Applicants must be willing to share the group’s innovative and promising approach with others.

We are seeking “out of the box”—innovative and promising— approaches to promoting community health and development. “Innovation” may include a unique or effective way of planning or implementing a change effort, creative use of existing community resources, original ways of generating participation and collaboration, implementing a best practice within a new context or group, or other innovative and promising approaches. We seek clear descriptions of how applicants took action in the community (currently or within the past three years); including Assessment, Planning, Taking Action, Evaluation, and Sustainability of the group’s efforts. The initiative should effectively address an issue of importance to the community.

To get an application: visit: http://ctb.ku.edu

Ashoka Changemakers “Changing Lives Through Football” competition
deadline to enter is June 11, 2010

Nike and Ashoka’s Changemakers are pleased to kick-off the “Changing Lives Through Football” competition, building on the success of two collaborative competitions that have helped surface the best ideas in the emerging field of sport for social change (the “Sport for a Better World” and “GameChangers: Change the Game for Women in Sport” competitions).

Whether through their partnerships in Africa that support communities that fight HIV/AIDS, or its “Stand Up Speak Up” campaign to empower sports fans to voice their opposition to racism, Nike has long recognized the power of football (“soccer” in the US) to affect real change.

Join us to identify, inspire, and bring together the next wave of leaders who are eager to find ways that football can unleash the potential of young people, strengthen their communities, boost development, and affect change.

Football is the sport that unites the world. Billions of fans cheer their favorite teams. As anticipation mounts for this year’s World Cup tournament — the first ever played on the African continent — there’s no better time to translate the excitement into new ideas that empower youth.

The global stage is set to inspire social change through football, and Nike and Changemakers invite you to join the team. Help find the next wave of leaders who are using football to unleash the potential of young people by participating in the Changing Lives Through Football collaborative competition on Changemakers.com.

Sport enables human potential, allowing new leaders to emerge on the playing field of sport or life. We invite individuals, teams, and organizations that are using football for social change join us on Changemakers.com between March 24 and August 11, 2010.

Do you have a new idea or a thriving program that encourages youth by expanding access to football? Share your knowledge with our global community. Tell us how to magnify the impact of a football-based innovation by applying it around the world.

There are several ways you can participate: you can recommend a project or idea that should enter, post a comment or question in the online dialogue, and vote for the winners. Your experience and insights are invaluable. Together we may uncover the creativity – and natural drive to innovate – within each of us.

Invite your friends and colleagues! Together we can use the sport as a powerful tool to drive social change, educating, supporting, and protecting our world’s young people.
Guidelines, Criteria and Prizes

The Changing Lives Through Football competition is open to all types of individuals and organizations (charitable organizations, private companies, or public entities) from all countries. We consider all entries that:

* Reflect the theme of the challenge: Changing Lives Through Football. The scope of the competition is to identify innovative solutions that use football to strengthen community, accelerate development and drive social change. Entries are invited from organizations and individuals in all countries.
* Indicate growth beyond the conceptual stage and have demonstrated impact and sustainability. While we support new ideas at every stage and encourage their entry, the judges are better able to evaluate programs that are beyond the conceptual stage and have demonstrated a proof of impact.
* Are submitted in English, Spanish, French, or Portuguese.

Please complete the entire entry form and submit by June 11, 2010, 5PM US EST. All decisions of the judges will be final.

Assessment Criteria

The winners of this Changemakers Collaborative Competition will be those entries that best meet the following criteria:

* Innovation: This is the knock-out test; if the work is not innovative the judges will not give it high rankings. The application must describe the systemic innovation that it is focused on. The innovation should be a unique model of change demonstrating a substantial difference from other initiatives in the field with the possibility for large-scale expansion.
* Social Impact: It is important that the innovative idea provides a system-changing solution for the field it addresses. Some innovations will have proven success at a small level, while others will have potential to grow, engaging millions of people. Still others will achieve their impact quickly, while some will seed change for the long term. Regardless of the level of demonstrated impact, it is important to see that the innovation has the ability to be applied in the U.S. and other countries. This will be judged by considering the scale strategy, ability to be replicated, clear how-tos, and the entrant’s ability to formulate a clear “road map” to reaching larger goals.
* Sustainability: For an innovation to be truly effective it must have a plan for how it will acquire financial and other bases of support for the long-term. Entries should describe not only how they are currently financing their work, but also how they plan to finance their work in the future. The most successful entrants go beyond discussing whether or not they will charge for services and describe a business plan. They should also demonstrate that they have strong partnerships and support networks to address an ongoing need, and to aid in scalability and the maintenance of a clear financial strategy.

Competition Deadlines, Procedures, and Rules

Online competition submissions are accepted until June 11, 2010 at 5PM US EST. At any time before this deadline, competition participants are encouraged to revise their entries based on questions and insights that they receive in the Changemakers discussion. Participation in the discussion enhances an entrant’s prospects in the competition and provides the community and the judges an opportunity to understand the entrant’s project more completely.

Winners will be expected to spend any prize money awarded in furtherance of the purposes of the project and/or organization for which the applicant has submitted an entry form.

There are four main phases in the competition:

* Entry Stage, March 24 – June 11, 2010: Entries can be submitted until 5PM US EST on April 21, 2010, and throughout this stage anyone can participate in an online review discussion with the entrants.
* Online Review and Judging, June 11 – July 20, 2010: Online review and discussion continues. Simultaneously, a panel of expert judges and a team of Ashoka staff select the competition finalists.
* Voting, July 21 – August 11, 2010: The Changemakers community votes online to select the award-winners from the field of finalists.
* Global and Regional Winners Announced– August 18, 2010

Prizes

3 Global Winners:

ONLINE WINNERS – A panel of independent judges selected by Ashoka or Nike and Ashoka staff will select between 10 and 15 finalists from all of the entries submitted in the competition. All entries will be evaluated pursuant to the criteria as stated above. From among these 10-15 finalists, the Changemakers’ online community will vote for 3 winners. In the event of a tie, the tie will be broken by a vote of the independent judges. Any person may sign into and register with Changemakers at: http://www.changemakers.com/en-us to vote.

* The finalist individual or organization that receives the most votes – will be our Grand Prize Winner and receive $30,000 USD.
* The finalist individual or organization that receives the second most votes will be our 2nd Place Winner and receive $20,000 USD
* The finalist individual or organization that receives the third most votes will be our 3rd Place Winner and receive $10,000 USD

Winners will be announced August 18, 2010.

3 Regional Winners:

None of the three global winners from the ONLINE COMPETITION will be eligible. The Regional Prizes will be selected by our expert panel of judges at the conclusion of the voting period according to the criteria as stated above.. All decisions by the judges are final. To be eligible, the individual’s or organization’s work must be focused on the particular region.

* The Brazil Prize: The best entrant individual or organization based and serving one or more communities in Brazil will be selected by our panel of expert judges and will receive $10,000 USD.
* The UK Prize: The best entrant individual or organization based and serving one or more communities in the UK will be selected by our panel of expert judges and will receive $10,000 USD
* The Africa Prize: The best entrant individual or organization based and serving one or more communities in Africa will be selected by our panel of expert judges and will receive $10,000 USD

Winners will be announced August 18, 2010.

2 Early Entry Prizes: The best two entries submitted by 5pm EST, April 28, 2010 will be eligible to win a digital camera (with a value equivalent of up to USD $400) and will be highlighted in Ashoka’s Changemakers marketing materials. Being an Early Entry Prize winner does not preclude you from winning the competition in any way, or guarantee finalist status. All entries will be equally evaluated per the Changemakers criteria at the completion of the entry period.

3rd HALF and NCDO Early Entry Prize: (Nationale Commissie voor Internationale Samenwerking en Duurzame Ontwikkeling – National Committee for International Cooperation and Sustainable Development). NCDO helps people and organizations in the Netherlands who dedicate themselves to improving the position of people in developing countries. It supports these local development projects with advice and subsidies.

Entry Deadline: May 12, 2010, 5:00p EST

Criteria:

* Must be an innovative small to medium project that uses sport as a tool for social change
* The entry must be submitted in English
* The project must be based in the Netherlands but focus its work on South Africa
* Aims to be a self-sustaining venture in the next 3 years. The entrepreneur/entrant is the legal owner of the initiative and therefore has the authority to decide with whom to cooperate and/or negotiate the terms of a potential deal.

Selection:

* A Dutch jury selected by NCDO will choose 5 finalists
* The finalists will pitch their ideas to the Dutch jury in the Dragon’s Den Final on June 3, 2010 – This final takes place during a big business event of SANEC (the South African chamber of commerce) and the Dutch Royal Football Association.
* Winner and 2 runners up will be announced on June 3, 2010

Grand Prize Winner:

A seven day all expenses paid trip for 2 (max) to South Africa during the World Cup (June 17 – 24, 2010) for the winning entrant. During this trip the implementation process of the business idea will start.

Second and Third Place Winners:

Win business training by a top consultancy firm.

Click here to find out more about NCDO’s 3rdHALF.

Participation in the challenge provides the opportunity to receive feedback from fellow entrants, Changemakers staff, judges, and the Changemakers community. Showcasing initiatives and demonstrating social impact advise potential investors about how best to maximize the strategic impact of their investments.

M·A·C AIDS Fund Accepting Grant Applications for Housing Services and Programs

The M·A·C AIDS Fund U.S. Community Grants Program supports organizations working to address the link between poverty and AIDS through grants for programs that are providing food and nutrition and housing services to people living with HIV and AIDS.

There are two application deadlines per year for the U.S. Community Grants program — one for food/nutrition applications and one for housing applications. (The 2010 deadline has passed.) Organizations may only apply for one of the two programs each year.

Priority will be given to direct-service programs. For the housing program, priority will be given to established AIDS housing services providers and programs providing direct housing services to clients.

Applicant organizations must have 501(c)(3) status.

The maximum grant amount that may be requested is $50,000.

Visit the M·A·C AIDS Fund Web site for complete program information and an eligibility quiz.

For application details: http://www.macaidsfund.org/#/work/application

Recently, a major European NGO asked me to comment on the future of global health:
At a time when the Health Bill is hitting the headlines in the USA and election battle lines are being drawn over the NHS in the UK, access to health care is playing on the minds of people the world over. What is on your mind?

Here is my response:

The future of global health lies on prevention
By Kelly N Patterson

I spent three years working with a small nonprofit, community-based primary health care and rural development organization in very rural Kwa Zulu Natal, South Africa. Back then, Hlabisa District was a grim setting with a 41.6% HIV prevalence rate with high incidences of TB, Malaria, and even a cholera epidemic, sprinkled with chronic diseases associated with developing countries like diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. Reasons for the advanced stage of the HIV epidemic in this district include: high level of labor migration; limited access to treatment for sexually transmitted diseases; low status of women; poor nutrition; and general poverty (80% unemployment at the time.)

This particular district had been historically under-funded due to politics and lacked the public services to cope with the growing demand for care. Essentially, this left the district with a disabling population of elderly women, living on welfare, and lots of children; the majority of the adult population either dead, or too sick to work.

Grandmothers could not afford to support themselves and orphaned children and ill adults on their pensions, so the older children would drop out of school. Older boys would resort to both petty and violent crime to obtain money or food for their homesteads. Older girls would often resort to prostitution for income and without education and access to birth control methods, more children. Thus the cycle of poverty, crime and disease continue. This is the current state of the world.

Therefore, to break this cycle, Global Health policies should focus on prevention, not the symptoms, of chronic, communicable and terminal diseases by addressing the seeds of all health issues: public infrastructure, economics and gender issues.

Public Infrastructure: This is everything from water and sanitation to roads and education. Education is critical to preventing most diseases (from nutrition and personal hygiene to reproductive health education); clean drinking water would significantly reduce water-borne diseases; easy access to public health clinics and pharmacies; adequate housing and access to mosquito netting; and proper sanitation systems are all necessary to preventing 80% of chronic and communicable diseases worldwide.

Economics: Affordable, easily accessible healthcare (from prevention to treatment to palliative care; especially, affordable equal access to pharmaceutical drugs); rural development with emphasis on good nutrition, personal hygiene and clean water systems; job development; investment in vaccines, micro-biocides and directly observed treatments (such as the TB DOTS program); local, national and international incentives for quality, multi-sectoral health policies, designed by nations, for their own people’s public health.

Gender issues: Over half of the world’s population is female and unless women have access to the same level of education, pay, rights, healthcare treatment, and protection as men, women will never have the power to improve their own health and the health of their children. This means over half of the world has no control over their own health.

In conclusion, global health care issues will never diminish unless people address the conditions which nurture most chronic, communicable and terminal diseases. Therefore, a holistic, multi-sectoral approach to global health policies is needed. The seeds of all global health issues, whether it be in the States or Sudan, come down to public infrastructure, economics and gender issues.

My ever-so humble opinion, Kelly N Patterson