The Elton John AIDS Foundation is accepting Letters of Intent for its 2011 open call for grant proposals.

For this funding round, as in previous years, EJAF invites LOIs from any proposed project that is aligned with EJAF grantmaking priorities including HIV programs focused on gay men’s health and rights, African American health and rights, youth mobilization for sexual health and rights, syringe access and harm reduction, prisoner re-entry, and scale-up of quality HIV programming in the southern United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

Any nonprofit organization located in the U.S., Canada, the Caribbean, and Central and South America may apply for funding.

Unsolicited proposals should request no more than $50,000 during the calendar year of 2011.

Organizations must complete the online LOI by June 1, 2011. Organizations approved to submit a full application will be notified by July 15, 2011, with full online applications due by September 1, 2011.

Visit the EJAF Web site for complete program guidelines and the online LOI form:  http://www.ejaf.org/pages/grants/eligibility/index.html

Countries: Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire / Ivory Coast, Gambia, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Senegal, Sierra Leone

Rolling Deadline

Through its main grantmaking programme “Rural Women Creating Change”, New Field Foundation supports African rural women, their organisations, and networks in sub-Saharan Africa to increase their agency over resources, information, and policy. Rural Women Creating Change grants are intended to enable:

Local Organising: to bring significant improvement to rural women’s organisations, their families, communities, and countries; Movement Building: to contribute to a dynamic movement of rural women who are creating social change; and Systemic Change: to promote African rural women’s leadership that creates economic justice, gender equity, and peace at local, provincial, and national levels.

New Field chooses to concentrate its support in regions that are going through transformation after years of conflict or other upheaval. The programme concentrates on three focus areas: 1) Casamance, Senegal: Kolda district; Kerewane, Gambia; 2) Mano River Union: Kissidougou, Guéckédou, and N’zerekore districts of Guinea; Kailahun and Kono districts of Sierra Leone; Lofa county of Liberia; and 3) Niger River Basin: border area between Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, and Mali.

The majority of these grants go to support local groups that are organising collectively to create “thriving, equitable, and peaceful communities for rural African women and their families.”  New Field Foundation is particularly interested in organisations that:

Are African-based, women-led, and community-centred; Increase the resources and agency of rural women’s organisations and networks; Can receive and manage international funds; Are well established in the communities in which they work; Demonstrate well functioning management, finance, and programmatic systems; and  Are benefiting rural women and their organisations through systemic change.

Application Information

New Field invites the submission of introductory information from organisations that have carefully reviewed their priorities and are a strong match in terms of programmatic focus, institutional identity, women’s leadership, and geographic location. New Field spends significant time getting to know an organisation before inviting a full proposal.

Contact

New Field Foundation

1016 Lincoln Boulevard
Mailbox 14

San Francisco CA

94129

United States

Tel: + 1 415 561 3417 Fax: + 1 415 561 3419

http://www.newfieldfound.org/grants.priorities.html

info@newfieldfound.org

 

Ashoka’s Changemakers Announces Geotourism Challenge to Save Coastal and Freshwater Destinations

Ashoka’s Changemakers, National Geographic, and the Inter-American Development Bank are hosting the Geotourism Challenge 2010: Places on the Edge: Saving Coastal and Freshwater Destinations competition to find innovative solutions for coastal, waterway, and island destinations that protect the environment and strengthen the heritage and livelihoods of local residents.

The Places on the Edge competition is open to all types of individuals and organizations (charitable organizations, private companies, or public entities). The competition seeks submissions describing sustainable models that enhance the unique character and beauty of oceans, rivers, bays, lakes, estuaries, and waterways, and the culture and heritage of their inhabitants.

Entries should describe innovative ideas that engage and educate tourists and local residents; prevent or curb pollution and waste; protect wildlife, coral reefs, and fisheries; and promote construction of innovative sustainable structures that withstand natural disasters like hurricanes, typhoons, earthquakes, and tsunamis. Innovations may include creative applications of technology, cultural and business practices, science, policies, and social organization.

To be eligible for awards, entries must indicate growth beyond the conceptual stage and have demonstrated impact and sustainability. While the competition’s sponsors support new ideas at every stage and encourage their entry, the judges are better able to evaluate programs that are beyond the conceptual stage and have demonstrated a proof of impact.

Entries may be submitted in English, Spanish, French, or Portuguese.

The top three entries will win $5,000 each. The best two entries submitted by the early entry deadline of October 20, 2010, will be eligible to each win $500. Through the Multilateral Investment Fund Opportunity 2010, the IADB and MIF will provide a total of up to $5 million of co-financing for competition entries that provide innovative ideas for sustainable destination management by micro- to medium-sized companies in the Latin America and the Caribbean region.

Visit the Changemakers Web site for complete competition guidelines and entry procedures.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has announced the opening of round six of its Grand Challenges Explorations, a $100 million grant initiative to encourage bold and unconventional global health solutions.

Grand Challenges Explorations offers researchers the chance to win grants of $100,000 to foster innovative projects with the potential to transform health in developing countries. The initiative focuses on areas where creative, unorthodox thinking is most urgently needed.

For this round, applicants are asked to focus their proposals on one of five topic areas: new approaches to cure HIV infection; next-generation sanitation technologies; low-cost cell phone-based applications for priority global health conditions; new technologies to support maternal and newborn health; and the poliovirus endgame: ways to accelerate, sustain, and monitor eradication.

The topic focusing on sanitation technologies highlights the integrated approach the foundation is taking toward health in developing countries. Improved sanitation is essential to reducing waterborne illnesses and has profound economic, educational, and social benefits.

The initiative uses a streamlined grantmaking process. Applications are two pages, and preliminary data about the proposed research is not required. All are encouraged to apply.

The foundation and an independent group of reviewers will select the most innovative proposals, and grants will be awarded within approximately four months from the proposal submission deadline.

Initial grants will be $100,000. Projects showing success will have the opportunity to receive additional funding of up to $1 million.
Grand Challenges Web site

2011 Buckminster Fuller Challenge

* awards
* solutions
* competition
* innovation

Call for Entries Deadline: October 4, 2010.

The Buckminster Fuller Institute announces the Call for Entries to the 2011 Buckminster Fuller Challenge, an annual $100,000 prize program to support the development and implementation of a solution that has significant potential to solve humanity’s most pressing problems.

In a statement about the Challenge, The Buckminster Fuller Institute explains the background of the prize program:

Short term reductionist thinking which dominates all industrialized societies is a fundamental cause of the massive social, economic and environmental deterioration our world is confronted with today. It is now painfully obvious to many that most attempts by civil, corporate, scientific, academic and government sectors to deal with these breakdowns, despite good intentions and significant investment, often exhibit little more than a reflexive default to the same reductionist approach that created the problems in the first place. Little if any attention is ever directed toward optimizing whole systems. Instead the focus remains riveted only on improving various parts in isolation. Not surprisingly, when it comes to solving complex problems, actions are typically fragmented, disjointed and piecemeal. The net result: on a global scale the level of deterioration is rapidly increasing and imbalances have already reached crisis proportions.

During the past half century pioneers like Buckminster Fuller and other visionaries responded to the failure of reductionism by developing new approaches to meeting human needs, concurrent with preserving the vital diversity of cultures and ecosystems that form the fabric of life on Earth. Their holistic approach has influenced thousands of individuals in numerous fields who continue to break new ground in how to think, plan and design.

This evolving and growing body of work contains the seeds, models and strategies for the fundamental shift in direction so urgently needed today. The work spans a range of development stages— from the conceptual phase, to prototype ready, to well proven models poised to scale up. However, most of these new approaches, even the most advanced, remain under funded, under recognized and have yet to significantly penetrate mainstream education, economic activity, media, philanthropy and public policy.

“We’re looking for solutions that address multiple problems without creating new ones down the road— integrated strategies dealing with key social, economic, environmental, policy and cultural issues. Our entry criteria is deeply inspired by what Fuller termed comprehensive anticipatory design science— an approach we feel holds an important key to the design of strategies aimed at having a transformative effect on the system as a whole. We are very grateful for the recognition the prize recipients have received to date and hope this will lead to the greater understanding and wide-spread application of the whole systems, design science approach we are championing.” said Elizabeth Thompson, Executive Director of the Buckminster Fuller Institute.

After decades of tracking world resources, innovations in science and technology, and human needs, Fuller asserted that options exist to successfully surmount the crises of unprecedented scope and complexity facing all humanity— he issued an urgent call for a design science revolution to make the world work for all.

ANWERING THIS CALL IS WHAT THE BUCKMINSTER FULLER CHALLENGE IS ALL ABOUT!

Please help us get the word out. Share this notice with your network, Thank you.
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Important Links
– The deadline for entries is 5pm (Eastern Standard Time) on MONDAY OCTOBER 4, 2010.
– For the call for entries, instructions for how to enter, reference materials, and much more, visit http://challenge.bfi.org
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About
The Buckminster Fuller Challenge originated in 2007 and awards $100,000 annually. Support for the program has been provided by the Atwater Kent Foundation, The Civil Society Institute, The James Dyson Foundation, The Highfield Foundation; The Jewish Communal Fund, and the members of The Buckminster Fuller Institute.

Founded in 1983 and headquartered in New York, The Buckminster Fuller Institute is dedicated to accelerating the development and deployment of solutions which radically advance human well being and the health of our planet’s ecosystems. BFI’s programs combine unique insight into global trends and local needs with a comprehensive approach to design. BFI encourages participants to conceive and apply transformative strategies based on a crucial synthesis of whole systems thinking, Nature’s fundamental principles, and an ethically driven worldview. By facilitating convergence across the disciplines of art, science, design and technology, BFI’s work extends the profoundly relevant legacy of R. Buckminster Fuller. For further information visit http://www.bfi.org

With a total community action fund of $100,000, Tom’s of Maine’s “50 States for Good” initiative is celebrating and rewarding nonprofits from across the country whose efforts are focused on lasting, positive change in the community.

Tom’s of Maine is hoping to inspire participation from nonprofits of all sizes and is excited to hear about the community projects that matter most to them. 501(c)(3) organizations from across the country are encouraged to apply for funding and invite their members/constituents to participate in the process. This year, applicant organizations are encouraged to be bold in sharing how they can best use new volunteers to benefit the community. In addition, the public is also welcome to invite their favorite nonprofit to join the program.

Finalists will be selected by a judging panel based on immediate achievability, positive impact in the community, and engagement and mobilization among members of the community. After finalists are selected, online voting by the public will determine which five organizations will receive $20,000 each.

For more info: http://www.tomsofmaine.com/community-involvement/living-well/project-sponsorships

Entries Invited for 2011 Nonprofit Collaboration Prize

The Collaboration Prize is a national award presented to nonprofit organizations that collaborate effectively to gain greater impact. The prize was created and is funded by the Lodestar Foundation in collaboration with the Arizona-Indiana-Michigan Alliance and leaders in the nonprofit sector.

The prize is designed to identify and showcase models of collaboration among nonprofit organizations. Recognizing the impact that can be achieved from working together, the prize identifies and showcases collaborations among two or more nonprofit organizations that cooperate to demonstrate innovative and effective responses to challenges or opportunities.

In 2011, the Collaboration Prize will award a total of $250,000 to the collaborations that best exemplify the impact that can result from working together. Each of the eight finalists will receive $12,500 and the winner will receive an additional $150,000.

Applications may be submitted by any individual familiar with the collaboration, including an employee of any entity involved in the collaboration.

Applications for the 2011 Collaboration Prize open June 1, 2010, and close on July 16, 2010.

Visit the Collaboration Prize Web site for compete program information.